X-Ray & Fluoroscopy

What is an X-ray Exam?

X-ray or radiography, as it is sometimes called, is a diagnostic medical procedure that uses radiation to produce x-ray images. This type of imaging is used to examine many parts of the body including the skeletal system, gastrointestinal system, respiratory system, vascular system and the uritogenital system.

There are several ways in which X-rays can be used to create an image.  Radiographs, or x-ray images, are still pictures similar to photographs. 

All X-ray examinations require signed requisitions by a physician or nurse practioner.  Some procedures require scheduled appointments. If you are unable to attend a scheduled appointment, it is imperative that you call the facility where your appointment is to let them know that so that another patient who is waiting for a procedure can be booked at that time.  

How do I prepare?

Dress casually and in loose clothing when you come for an X-ray procedure, as more than likely you will have to change into a gown. Dressing in a casual manner allows ease in changing. You may not have to take off all of your clothing, but the technologist will let you know exactly which items need to be removed for the procedure.   You may also be asked to remove any jewellery such as watches, necklaces, earrings and body piercings which would interfere with acquiring the image. 

What is involved?

After checking in for your exam, you may be asked to change into a gown in the X-ray area.  The technologist (this is the non-physician professional who will be performing the procedure) will take you to the examination room and direct you to stand, sit or lay on the table/stretcher.  They will then help you into a position that will generate the precise picture that your physician has asked for.  It is very important to hold still and follow the breathing instructions that you are given.  The technologist will then press the exposure button and an x-ray – or radiograph - is created on film or a special screen.  A computer then analyzes the “film” to make the image that is seen on the television monitor of the X-ray machine.  You will not feel the x-rays while the picture is being taken, but sometimes you may be asked to hold a difficult position or your breath for a few seconds. 

How long will it take?

The length of the procedure will depend on the body part being examined and may vary slightly at the different sites in Winnipeg.  This information is outlined more specifically in the attached link.

How do I get my results?

Your results will be read by a radiologist, and a report will be sent to your referring physician, who will go over the results with you.

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